Reasons for Hearing Loss

ENT for Ear Problems



Eustachian Tube DilationThe eustachian tube is the structure that connects the nose and the middle ear. This tube ventilates the middle and helps with drainage and disease protection. A healthy and normal eustachian tube is normally closed but opens when you swallow, yawn, or chew. 

When this tube becomes blocked, it’s easily noticed. A cold, allergies, or a sinus infection can block up these tubes, causing fluid to accumulate. It can also be caused by obesity and smoking. This congestion and fluid buildup can be painful, and it can also lead to an ear infection if the fluid becomes infected with bacteria.

Symptoms of a blockage in your eustachian tubes include:

  • Your ears may feel plugged or full.
  • Sounds may seem muffled.
  • You may feel a popping or clicking sensation (children may say their ear “tickles”).
  • You may have pain in one or both ears.
  • You may hear ringing in your ears.
  • You may sometimes have trouble keeping your balance.

How is Eustachian Tube Dysfunction Diagnosed?

When you visit our ENT doctor in Los Angeles, you can list all your symptoms so we can begin to formulate a potential diagnosis. An ear specialist can take an otoscope for a better look into your ear canal. This will enable them to view your eardrum. They can also take a look at your nasal passages and down the back of your throat.

There are multiple methods for checking your eustachian tubes.

Treatments for Dysfunctional Eustachian Tubes

We now offer dilation treatment for eustachian tube dysfunction, and this procedure can help the valve of the eustachian tube to open and or close properly. When you visit an ear doctor from Westside Head & Neck, we’ll give you a comprehensive exam and a list of treatment options. 

The discomfort associated with eustachian tube dysfunction will usually go away on its own without treatment. 

If you want to try to open them up on your own, you can do simple exercises to aid this process. You can try to open your eustachian tubes by swallowing, yawning, or chewing gum. You can also release pressure by taking a deep breath, pinching your nostrils closed, and “blowing” with your mouth shut. However, this should only be done a few times, and if the “full” feeling does not go away, you should consult a professional, as continuing to do this can rupture your eardrum.

If you think your baby is suffering from this condition, try feeding them or giving them a pacifier. These encourage the swallow reflex, which can then cause the eustachian tubes to open.

If these strategies don’t work, your doctor may suggest other options. These can include:

  • Using a decongestant to reduce the swelling of the tubes.
  • Taking an antihistamine or using a steroid nasal spray to treat your allergies.

If you visit an ENT specialist, they can also perform procedures that can correct this issue. Common medical treatments for congested eustachian tubes include:

  • Making a tiny incision in the eardrum to drain the accumulated fluid in the middle ear. 
  • Implanting tubes in the eardrums, as these can help drain your middle ear. This treatment is especially common for children who get frequent ear infections.
  • Undergoing eustachian tube balloon dilation. A doctor can use a catheter to insert a small balloon through your nose and into the Eustachian tube. They then inflate this tube to open a pathway for mucus and air to flow through the tube. This can help it function properly.

If you are suffering from ear congestion, it may be due to your dysfunctioning eustachian tubes. Luckily for you, there are multiple ways to treat this condition. 

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How the Ear Works


The ear has three main parts: the outer ear, the middle ear & the inner ear.

The outer ear, including the external auditory canal, (the part you can see) opens into the ear canal. The eardrum (tympanic membrane) separates the ear canal from the middle ear. The middle ear contains three small bones which help amplify and transfer sound to the inner ear. These three bones, or ossicles, are called the malleus (or hammer), the incus (or anvil), and the stapes (or stirrup). The inner ear contains the cochlea which changes sound into neurological signals and the auditory (hearing) nerve, which takes sound to the brain.Ear Anatomy

Eustachian Tube DilationAny source of sound sends vibrations or sound waves into the air. These funnel through the ear opening, down the external ear canal, and strike your eardrum, causing it to vibrate. The vibrations are passed to the three small bones of the middle ear, which transmit them to the cochlea. The cochlea contains tubes filled with fluid. Inside one of the tubes, tiny hair cells pick up the vibrations and convert them into nerve impulses. These impulses are delivered to the brain via the hearing nerve. The brain interprets the impulses as sound (music, voice, a car horn, etc.).

Hearing & Ear Problems

  • Balance Disorder
  • Central Auditory Processing Disorder
  • Cholesteatoma
  • Chronic Ear Infections
  • Chronic Middle Ear Fluid
  • Dizziness: Lightheadedness & Vertigo
  • Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV)
  • Meniere’s Disease/ Endolymphatic hydrops
  • Earaches & Otitis Media
  • Ear wax/ Cerumen/ Glue Ear
  • Eustachian Tube Dysfunction
  • Exostosis/ Surfer’s ear
  • Hearing loss
  • Mastoiditis
  • Otosclerosis
  • Perforated Eardrum
  • Tinnitus
  • Vestibular neuritis/ Labyrinthitis

Treatments

  • Cerumen (ear wax) removal
  • Otoplasty Ear Correction Plastic Surgery
  • Mastoidectomy
  • Myringotomy with (Ventilating) Tubes
  • Stapedectomy
  • Tinnitus Evaluation and Retraining Therapy
  • Tympanomastoidectomy
  • Tympanoplasty
  • Vestibular Rehabilitation

Outer Ear Infections
Outer ear infections can cause itching in the ear canal, pain and swelling of the ear canal, discharge from the ear, and crusting around the ear canal. Your physician will carefully clean and dry your ear. If your ear is very swollen, the physician may insert a wick soaked with an antibiotic into the ear to get the medicine into the infected area. You may need to put drops in your ear several times a day to keep the wick moist. Oral antibiotics may also be indicated if you have a severe infection, or your physician may suggest a cream or ointment medicine for some types of infection.

Middle Ear Infections
A middle ear infection is an infection of the air-filled space in the ear behind the eardrum. Ear infections usually begin with a viral infection of the nose and throat. Ear infections may also occur when you have allergies. Symptoms of a middle ear infection include earache, hearing loss, feeling of blockage in the ear, fever, and dizziness. The physician will check for fluid behind the eardrum, and a hearing test may also be recommended if you are experiencing hearing loss. Antibiotic medicine is a common treatment for ear infections. However, recent studies have shown that the symptoms of ear infections often go away in a couple of days without antibiotics. Your provider may recommend a decongestant (tablets or a nasal spray) to help clear the eustachian tube.

Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo
Benign Proxysmal Positional Vertigo is one of the most common causes of vertigo in adults. It presents with the illusion of movement, which occurs within a few seconds of a change in head positioning. Most commonly a short sensation of spinning is experienced after lying down in bed, arising in the morning, or rolling over in bed at night, but may also occur when one looks up to a high shelf, or down under furniture. Typically, the symptoms last seconds to minutes or so before resolving. BPPV is due to microscopic crystals, or otoconia, floating around in one of the compartments of the inner ear. The movement of these particles stimulate the sensory endings of the vestibular (balance) nerve, producing vertigo.

The good news is that BPPV responds well to physical therapy maneuvers. Medications rarely help. A trained physician or vestibular therapist can perform therapy which can rapidly eliminate the symptoms of dizziness. These maneuvers are designed to relocate the crystals to a part of the inner ear where they will not produce any symptoms. Treatments for BPPV can usually be performed in one or two sessions with very high success rates. This office frequently diagnosis and properly treats this disorder.

Meniere’s Disease
Meniere’s Disease is a problem in the inner ear. It can cause severe dizziness (vertigo) and hearing loss. It usually affects just one ear, but it can happen in both ears. There can be a significant hearing loss, but complete deafness is rare. The symptoms can be mild or severe. Although the dizziness can be very disabling, it can usually be controlled.

Earwax
Excessive amounts of earwax, or cerumen, can block the ear canal and cause temporary hearing impairment. Earwax should be removed only by a professional. Q-tips, ear candeling, or other methods of home earwax removal are not recommended. Please consult your physician if you suspect earwax impaction.

Labyrinthitis & Vestibular Neuritis
Labyrinthitis is an inflammation of the inner ear. Vestibular neuritis is an inflammation of the nerves connecting the inner ear to the brain. In vestibular neuritis, a virus similar to the herpes virus causes an infection. This infection causes swelling and inflammation of the vestibular nerves or the labyrinth. Sometimes bacteria from a middle ear infection cause labyrinthitis. Symptoms of vestibular neuritis and labyrinthitis include dizziness or vertigo, trouble maintaining balance, and nausea. Diagnosis may include a hearing evaluation, balance testing, an MRI scan, and possible blood testing.

Otosclerosis
Otosclerosis is the abnormal growth of bone in the middle ear which can cause conductive hearing loss, or the prevention of the normal transmission of sound. It is most common for otosclerosis to affect one of the bones in the middle ear called the stapes. Other symptoms of otoscerlosis may include ringing in the ears and dizziness. Otosclerosis can be diagnosed by your ENT physician, and will include a hearing evaluation by an audiologist. Treatment may consist of a surgery called a stapedectomy, where a prosthetic device replaces the abnormal bone growth.

Tinnitus (ringing in the ears)
Tinnitus (ringing in the ears) is not normal, and can be a symptom of other disorders. Some of the causes of tinnitus are hearing loss, noise exposure, ear infections, sinus infections, Meniere’s disease, ear or head injury, otosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, certain medications, anxiety or stress, heavy smoking, and thyroid disorders. Tinnitus can be described as ringing, buzzing, crickets, escaping air, and many other types of sound. Your physician will ask about your symptoms and may order a hearing test, scans, or blood work to determine the possible cause. Treatment options may include a hearing aid or masking device, Tinnitus Retraining Therapy (TRT), and perhaps certain medication.

Hearing Loss
Types of hearing loss: Hearing loss is categorized by what part of the auditory system is damaged. These fall into three categories: Conductive hearing loss, sensorineural hearing loss, or mixed hearing loss.

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